Diana Mutz, Ph.D.

SAMUEL A. STOUFFER PROFESSOR OF COMMUNICATION AND POLITICAL SCIENCE
dmutz@asc.upenn.edu
Phone: 215-746-0202

Diana C. Mutz, Ph.D. Stanford University, teaches and does research on public opinion, political psychology and mass political behavior, with a particular emphasis on political communication.

RESEARCH

She has published articles in a variety of academic journals including American Political Science Review, American Journal of Political Science, Public Opinion Quarterly, Journal of Politics, and Journal of Communication. She is also the author of Impersonal Influence: How Perceptions of Mass Collectives Affect Political Attitudes (Cambridge University Press, 1998), a book awarded the Robert Lane Prize for the Best Book in Political Psychology by the American Political Science Association. She served as past editor of Political Behavior, and currently serves as co-principal investigator of Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences (TESS), an interdisciplinary infrastructure project that promotes methodological innovation across the social sciences. Professor Mutz is also part of the graduate group in the Population Studies Center and in the Department of Psychology at Penn. Before coming to Penn, Professor Mutz taught at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and the Ohio State University.

COURSES TAUGHT

  • Public Opinion in American Democracy
  • Mass Media and Politics
  • Political Communication
  • Quantitative Methods of Political Inquiry
  • Political Psychology




PUBLICATIONS

"Social Trust and E-Commerce: Experimental Evidence for the Effects of Social Trust on Individuals’ Economic Behavior." Public Opinion Quarterly, 2005 69(3):393-416.

"Cross-Cutting Social Networks: Testing Democratic Theory in Practice." American Political Science Review, March 2002, 96 (2): 111-26.

"The Consequences of Cross-Cutting Networks for Political Participation." American Journal of Political Science, October 2002, 46 (4): 838-55.

"Facilitating Communication Across Lines of Political Difference: The Role of Mass Media." (with Paul M. Martin). American Political Science Review, March 2001, 95 (1): 97-114.

Impersonal Influence: How Perceptions of Mass Collectives Affect Political Attitudes. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998


Press Requests

Professor Diana Mutz can be available for news interviews.  Please contact Joseph J. Diorio at 215-746-1798 to make arrangements.

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