Faculty Videos

Uploaded on 15 Dec 2014

Barbie Zelizer, Ph.D., author of "About to Die: How News Images Move the Public," talks about violent images in the news in an interview with the Al Jazeera English television program "Listening Post."

Uploaded on 24 Oct 2014


October 24, 2014: Lecture by Devra Moehler, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Communication, Annenberg School for Communication.

The Elihu Katz Colloquium Series is named in honor of Professor Elihu Katz, Ph.D., Distinguished Trustee Professor Emeritus of Communication at the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication and one the founding fathers of communication research. 

Uploaded on 23 Oct 2014

Annenberg Professor Sharrona Pearl was one of the featured speakers during the PopTech conference in Camden, Maine Oct. 23 – 25. Her talk focused on her research into facial transplants; what does your face say about who you are? What happens when the face you wear is not your own? She discussed her research into facial allografts, "facial transplants," as a way to think about what faces tell us, and what we do when we can no longer trust them.

Uploaded on 13 Oct 2014

October 3, 2014: Lecture by Joseph N. Cappella, Ph.D., Gerald R. Miller Professor of Communication, Annenberg School for Communication.

The Elihu Katz Colloquium Series is named in honor of Professor Elihu Katz, Ph.D., Distinguished Trustee Professor Emeritus of Communication at the University of Pennsylvania’s Annenberg School for Communication and one the founding fathers of communication research. 

Uploaded on 23 Aug 2014

Joseph Turow, Ph.D., the Robert Lewis Shayon Professor of Communication, walks us through his book Playing Doctor: Television, Storytelling, and Medical Power, an engaging and highly perceptive history of the medical TV series from its inception to the present day. Turow offers an inside look at the creation of iconic doctor shows as well as a detailed history of the programs, an analysis of changing public perceptions of doctors and medicine, and an insightful commentary on how medical dramas have both exploited and shaped these perceptions.

Pages