Global and Comparative Communication Videos

Uploaded on 06 May 2016

Honing the Visual was a conference organized by the Center for Global Communcation Studies at Annenberg on January 28-29, 2016. It brought together academics, human rights practitioners, journalists, filmmakers and policy makers to examine the interplay between visuals and human rights. It sought to address how, under which circumstances, and to what ends visual technologies and platforms shape the recognition and restitution of human rights claims. On this Panel: 

  • Lawrence Douglas (Amherst College, USA), Voice and Visuals in the Trials of John Demjnajuk
  • Keith D. Hiatt (University of California Berkeley, USA), Think Visual: “Open Source” Video as Evidence in International Human Rights Tribunals
  • Rebecca Wexler (Yale University, USA), A Rule of Equivalents: Video as Big Data Collection for Purposes of Investigation and Trial
  • Nenad Golcevski (International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, The Netherlands), Communicating Justice Through Visuals: The Limitations of an Unlimited Field
  • Moderator: Lyndsey Beutin (Annenberg School for Communication) 
Uploaded on 06 May 2016

Honing the Visual was a conference organized by the Center for Global Communcation Studies at Annenberg on January 28-29, 2016. It brought together academics, human rights practitioners, journalists, filmmakers and policy makers to examine the interplay between visuals and human rights. It sought to address how, under which circumstances, and to what ends visual technologies and platforms shape the recognition and restitution of human rights claims. On this Panel: 

  • Alice Baroni (Pontifical Catholic University, Brazil), Contested Visualities: Risk, Fear and Human Rights in Portraying Rio de Janeiro’s Favelas
  • Taylor-Rae Collins-Headley (University of Pennsylvania, USA), Undermining Equality: #AllLivesMatter as Anti-democratic Propaganda
  • Csaba Szilagyi (Open Society Archive, Hungary), Reimagining the Archive of the Powerless: Toward a Virtual Model Encouraging Community Contribution
  • Min Htin Ko Ko Gyi (Human Rights Human Dignity Film Festival, Myanmar), Organizing the Human Rights Film Festival in (Myanmar) Burma
  • Moderator: Arjun Shankar (School of Social Policy and Practice) 
Uploaded on 06 May 2016

Honing the Visual was a conference organized by the Center for Global Communcation Studies at Annenberg on January 28-29, 2016. It brought together academics, human rights practitioners, journalists, filmmakers and policy makers to examine the interplay between visuals and human rights. It sought to address how, under which circumstances, and to what ends visual technologies and platforms shape the recognition and restitution of human rights claims. On this Panel: 

  • James Walker (University of California Los Angeles, USA), The Rise of GEOINT: Technology, Intelligence and Human Rights
  • Christoph Koettl (Amnesty International, USA), When YouTube Meets Google Earth: Unearthing Evidence through Citizen Video and Remote Sensing
  • Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick (University of San Diego, USA), Do Drones Fit into the Human Rights Advocate’s Toolkit?
  • Claudia Martinez Mansell (independent researcher, formerly UN’s Emergency and Rehabilitation Division), The View from Above: Aerial Photography and “the Right to the City” in a Refugee Camp
  • Moderator: John Remensperger (Annenberg School for Communication)
Uploaded on 06 May 2016

Honing the Visual was a conference organized by the Center for Global Communcation Studies at Annenberg on January 28-29, 2016. It brought together academics, human rights practitioners, journalists, filmmakers and policy makers to examine the interplay between visuals and human rights. It sought to address how, under which circumstances, and to what ends visual technologies and platforms shape the recognition and restitution of human rights claims. On this Panel: 

  • Sharon Sliwniski (University of Western Ontario, Canada), Precarious Evidence: One Photograph from Northern British Columbia
  • Deborah A. Thomas (University of Pennsylvania, USA), Visual Witnessing: Affect, Repair and AfroDiasporic Counterpublics
  • Gabriela Martínez (University of Oregon, USA), Yuyanapaq: The Visual Dimensions of Transitional Justice
  • Moses Chrispus Okello (IGAD Conflict Early Warning & Response Mechanisms, Ethiopia), Images of Conflict, Imaginings of Peace
  • Moderator: Mariam Durrani (Department of Anthropology, School of Arts and Sciences) 
Uploaded on 19 Apr 2016

Uprisings spread like wildfire across the Arab world from 2010 to 2012, fueled by a desire for popular sovereignty. Investigating what drives people to risk everything to express themselves in rebellious art, The Naked Blogger of Cairo uncovers the creative insurgency at the heart of the Arab uprisings. While commentators have stressed the role of social media, Marwan M. Kraidy shows that the essential medium of political expression was not texting or Twitter, but something more fundamental: the human body. Here, Kraidy discusses the themes in his book, available from Harvard University Press on May 9, 2016.

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