Annenberg Presentations at NCA 2018

The National Communication Association’s 104th annual convention, “Communication at Play,” will take place November 8-11 in Salt Lake City, Utah. Below are the presentations being contributed by Annenberg faculty and graduate students, organized by date and time. Most events will take place at the Salt Palace Convention Center, although a few sessions will meet at the Hilton Salt Lake City Center. For more convention information or to view the entire program, please visit NCA’s website.

Thursday, November 8

8:00am – 9:15am

Lyrical Power: Song, Identity, and Cultural Studies (Hilton, Grand Ballroom B)

  • John Vilanova – "Roots Routes: Japan, Jamaica, and the Surprising Global Flows of Vintage Reggae Vinyl"

3:30pm – 4:45pm

State Reactions to Crisis and Challenge (Salt Palace Convention Center, 251E)

  • Kecheng Fang – “Anime and Pop Idols as Ideology Propagators in China: Novel Strategies and Limitations of State Propaganda in the Social Media Era”

Friday, November 9

11:00am – 12:15pm

Mass Communication Division - Top Student Papers (Salt Palace Convention Center, 255C)

  • Tian Yang and Yilang Peng – "How Trending Topics Gatekeep News Consumption on Social Media: A Natural Experiment on Weibo"

12:30pm – 1:45pm

Top Student Paper Session (Salt Palace Convention Center, 355C)

  • Alvin Zhou – "Bigger Playground, Better Dialogues? A Large-Scale Examination of Corporate Twitter Communication in the 280-Character Era"

2:00pm – 3:15pm

Scholarship on Media and Technology (Salt Palace Convention Center, Hall A)

  • Soojong Kim –  “Directionality of Information Flow and Echoes without Chambers"

Media Representations and Effects of Sexual Violence and Harassment (Salt Palace Convention Center, 255C)

  • Celeste M. Wagner - “Reading Women and Reading Men: Effect of Sex of Source on Perceived Severity of Sexual Harassment”

Saturday, November 10

2:00pm – 3:15pm

Applied Communication Division Top Student Paper Panel (Salt Palace Convention Center, 254A)

  • Yilang Peng – "The Impact of Information about What Majority Scientists Believe to Be True in a Dual-Processing World"