Undergraduate Course Descriptions

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COMM 290

Special Topics // Intro to Data Analysis for Communication

  • Fall 2020

In this course, we will learn the basic tools of data analysis and apply them to answer various questions in communication science. Can reluctant parents be convinced to vaccinate their children? Can get-out-the-vote mailings mobilize voters? Does the diffusion of political rumors affect public opinion? Are toxic comments more likely to go viral on Facebook? These are examples of the questions that we will answer using pre-existing datasets as well as a new online experiment that we will run together as part of the course. There is no official prerequisite for this class and students are not expected to have any familiarity with statistical programming. Students will be given step-by-step instructions and we will work together to analyze the datasets. For the final project, each student will write a research note based on their analysis of the new experimental data. At the end of this course, students will be able to use quantitative data to extract statistical patterns and answer empirical questions. These skills will be extremely useful in various settings, from academia to the media and tech industry and more.

COMM 290

Special Topics // Introduction to Network Analysis

  • Summer 2021

This introductory course is designed to bring you the necessary knowledge and techniques to understand, analyze, interpret, and visualize networks. Lectures will cover major theories and models in the field of network analysis, while in-class labs will teach you how to use software to analyze real-world network data. No previous coding or statistics knowledge is required. The course will teach you how to collect and manage network data, and how to analyze that data using measures of centrality, popularity, clustering, etc. The goal of this course is to provide you with basic knowledge of network methods and theories, and allow you to familiarize with network analysis software. By the end of the course, you should be able to apply network thinking to everyday social phenomena.

COMM 313

Computational Text Analysis for Communication Research

  • Spring 2021

In this 'big data' era, presidents and popes tweet daily. Anyone can broadcast their thoughts and experiences through social media. Speeches, debates and events are recorded in online text archives. The resulting explosion of available textual data means that journalists and marketers summarize ideas and events by visualizing the results of textual analysis (the ubiquitous 'word cloud' just scratches the surface of what is possible). Automated text analysis reveals similarities and differences between groups of people and ideological positions. In this hands-on course students will learn how to manage large textual datasets (e.g. Twitter, YouTube, news stories) to investigate research questions. They will work through a series of steps to collect, organize, analyze and present textual data by using automated tools toward a final project of relevant interest. The course will cover linguistic theory and techniques that can be applied to textual data (particularly from the fields of corpus linguistics and natural language processing). No prior programming experience is required. Through this course students will gain skills writing Python programs to handle large amounts of textual data and become familiar with one of the key techniques used by data scientists, which is currently one of the most in-demand jobs.

COMM 318

Stories From Data: Introduction to Programming for Data Journalism

  • Fall 2020
  • Fall 2021

Today masses of data are available everywhere, capturing information on just about everything and anything. Related but distinct data streams about newsworthy events and issues -- including activity from social media and open data sources (e.g., The Open Government Initiative) -- have given rise to a new source for and style of reporting sometimes called Data Journalism. Increasingly, news sites and information portals present visually engaging, dynamic, and interactive stories linked to the underlying data (e.g., The Guardian DataBlog). This course offers an introduction to Python programming for data analysis and visualization. Students will learn how to collect, analyze, and present various forms of data. Because numbers and their visualizations do not speak for themselves but require context, interpretation, and narrative, students will practice making effective stories from data and presenting them in blogs and other formats. No programming experience is required for this class.

COMM 367

Communication in the Networked Age

  • Fall 2020

Communication technologies, including the internet, social media, and countless online applications create the infrastructure and interface through which many of our interactions take place today. This form of networked communication opens new questions about how we establish relationships, engage in public, build a sense of identity, promote social change, or delimit the private domain. The ubiquitous adoption of new technologies has also produced, as a byproduct, new ways of observing the world: many of our interactions now leave a digital trail that, if followed, can help us unravel the determinants and outcomes of human communication in unprecedented ways. This course will give you the theoretical and analytical tools to critically assess research that uses networked technologies to produce new evidence about communication dynamics, their effects, and how to promote social change.

COMM 407

Understanding Social Networks

  • Fall 2021

Digital technologies have made communication networks ubiquitous: even when we can’t really notice them, they mediate most aspects of our daily activities. Networks, however, have always been the backbone of social life: long before Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat, or other similar platforms, communication created channels for information diffusion that linked people in a myriad other ways. Through letters, commerce, or simply face to face interactions, people have always been exposed to the behavior of others. These communicative ties embed us into an invisible web of influence that we can make tangible and analyze. This course will teach you how to map those connections in the form of networks, and how to study those networks so that we can improve our understanding of social life. The goal is to help you grasp the consequences of connectivity, and how small changes in the structure of our ties can lead to big differences in how networks behave.

COMM 432

Digital Inequality

  • Fall 2020
  • Fall 2021

Digital information and communication technologies are intertwined with our everyday lives, from banking, to working, and dating. They’re also increasingly crucial parts of our most powerful institutions, from policing, to the welfare state, and education. This course examines the ways that these technologies combine with traditional axes of inequality like race, gender, and class in ways that may deepen social inequality. We’ll consider major approaches to understanding digital inequalities and apply them to case studies of both problems and solutions. Students will learn to critically analyze policies and programs from a variety of perspectives, and to evaluate the promise of digital technologies against their potential perils.

COMM 441

The Impact of the Internet, Social Media, and Information Technology on Democracy

At the turn of the 21st century, many claimed that the internet would make the world a more democratic place. Have these prophecies borne out? We examine the effects the internet has had on democracy, looking at research that examines whether, for instance, the internet has increased or decreased inequality, polarization, and political participation. In addition to reading and discussing empirical literature, we will also test many of the theories in this course through hands-on workshops in data analysis.

COMM 459

Social Networks and the Spread of Behavior

  • Spring 2021

This course explores the nature of diffusion through social networks, the ways networks are formed and shaped by social structures, and the role they play in health behavior, public policy, and innovation adoption. Topics include: the theory of social networks; the small world model of network structure; constructing models to represent society; the social bases of the adoption of innovations and the spread of new ideas; the role of social networks in controlling changes in public opinion; the emergence of unexpected fashions, fads, and social movements; and the connection between social network models and the design of public policy interventions. Students will learn how to use the agent-based computational modeling tool "NetLogo", and they will work directly with the models to understand how to test scientific theories. We will examine the basic theory of social networks in offline, face-to-face, networks, as well as the role of online networks in spreading new ideas and behaviors through social media. Long standing debates on the effects of social networks on changing beliefs and behaviors, their impact on social change, and ethical concerns regarding their potential manipulation will be given careful consideration throughout. Students will be taught new skills that will enable them to use and develop their own agent-based models.